Rosemary Salad Dressing

Rosemary Salad Dressing

The humble salad dressing. It may be humble but did you know that dressing your salad in a simple home made dressing can increase your absorption of nutrients and have anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antioxidant actions?

People often purchase store bought salad dressings for the convenience. And we get it, it can be easier than making your own dressing every day. Unfortunately though, most of the store bought dressings contain preservatives, thickeners, sugar, sweeteners etc and many of them don’t contain oil. Which is a crying shame because a good quality oil in your salad dressing will help you to absorb fat soluble nutrients like Vitamin A, D, E and K.

Making your own dressing gives you the opportunity to use foods that can have an almost medicinal effect, like Rosemary.

Rosemary is a beautiful, full flavoured herb that is hardy enough for anyone to grow in a pot or in the garden. It has been used medicinally for centuries to assist with everything from poor immunity to poor circulation to period pain. Modern studies suggest that 2 compounds found in Rosemary – Rosmarinic Acid and Carnosic Acid may be beneficial in the fight against brain ageing and Alzheimers, due to their ability to reduce amyloid plaques and oxidative damage in the brain. All from a herb you can grow at home!

This yummy dressing packs a flavor punch but also contains omega 3 fatty acids, as well as vinegar to assist digestion and garlic to support a healthy cardiovascular and immune system. You can make up a double batch and store in a glass jar in the fridge for a couple of months.

Rosemary Salad Dressing
Make 3/4cup

1/3c Organic balsamic vinegar
1 -2 Cloves of garlic
1tbsp Fresh rosemary
2tsp Dijon mustard
1/2c Flaxseed oil or macadamia oil or olive oil
2tbsp Water
Salt and pepper to taste

Place all ingredients except oil into a blender and blend until mixture is smooth. Slowly add oil on a lower speed until well combine. Store in a glass container in.

 

 

With gratitude,
Emma (Nutritionist)